2.5x moreAmericans suffer from mental illnessthan cancer, heart disease and diabetes combined.

But we can outnumber the numbers.

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We’ve touched the lives of more than 40,000 people.

This is the story
of one.

GIVE HOPE TO OTHERS

Mental illness is the number one
health problem
facing our nation.

It’s a dangerously silent epidemic. Though the statistics are staggering, mental illness remains shrouded in stigma, and research and access to treatment continue to be severely underfunded.

But there is a path to lasting change. And it starts at Lindner Center of HOPE. Representing the leading edge of patient care and research in mental illness, the Center has served as a lifeline for more than 40,000 patients since 2008.

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Taking on the opioid crisis.

We have to win the battle. Before we lose a generation.

Every 8 minutes in America, someone dies from misuse of opioids. Overall, deaths from prescription opioid overdoses in the US now exceed those killed in automobile accidents.

And the crisis has Greater Cincinnati in its grip.

Through treatment, advocacy, and education, Lindner Center of HOPE is committed to devoting the resources necessary to shape the solutions that can end this crisis.

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An unprecedented opportunity.

Thanks to the generosity of Cincinnati humanitarians Linda and Harry Fath and Frances and Craig Lindner, there’s never been a more opportune time to make real inroads in alleviating suffering for so many.

The Faths and Lindners have made a commitment to Lindner Center of HOPE and challenge the community to join them in supporting the mission of the Center.

Please join us in taking on two of our community’s and nation’s toughest challenges.

About the Campaign

Ending the stigma of mental illness starts with open conversation.

We all have a story and with the Make Waves Project, we’re inviting you to share a little about your – or a loved one’s – mental illness journey. To participate, simply record your story on your smart phone, tablet or computer and send the audio file to makewaves@lindnercenter.org. For help with recording, and to hear other stories, follow the link below.

Make waves. Break the silence. Share your story.

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A leader does not do what has always been done.

Lindner Center of HOPE was established not to replicate what was already in existence in mental health care, but rather to set a new standard.

Founded in 2008 as a non-profit comprehensive mental health center, our unique model includes a state-of-the-science research institute as well as inpatient and outpatient diagnosis and treatment programs.

The goal: become the top-level mental health care delivery system in the nation with outcomes that prove it.

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Mental health is a journey. We make hope its constant companion.

“For Frances and me, Lindner Center of HOPE started as a dream and a vision. Every family is touched by someone who suffers from a mental illness.”

Lindner Center of HOPE
Co-founder Craig Lindner

The vision for the Lindner Center of HOPE came to life through the compassion and foresight of Frances and Craig Lindner in 2005. Recognizing a true need for comprehensive and quality mental health care in the region, they enlisted a “dream team” to develop a mental health center of excellence that would offer a continuum of care in one location, rather than the fragmented system that existed.

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Pioneering life-changing research

Our investment in our patients – and hope – begins with an investment in research.

In affiliation with the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, the Center’s Research Institute not only actively pioneers new disorder findings, but also integrates proven advancements into daily patient treatment and care. Our research encompasses common mental illnesses, including:

  • Schizophrenia
  • Major depression
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Eating and weight disorders
  • Anxiety disorders
  • ADHD
  • Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders
  • Addictions

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Our History

Click on an item on the timeline to learn more.

August 2008

The 100,000 sq. ft. Lindner Center of HOPE opens to patients.

October 2008

Lindner Center of HOPE designated as a National Center of Excellence by the National Network of Depression Centers.

March 2009

Craig and Frances Lindner receive the Innovator Award at the 2009 Health Care Heroes Awards Dinner hosted by the Business Courier.

Lindner Center of HOPE becomes a research partner with Mayo Clinic on the Bipolar Biobank.

July 2009

Outpatient Service expands to accommodate children ages two and older.

November 2009

The Farmer Family Neuromodulation Center opens. (ECT and TMS)

May 2011

Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health announce clinical, research and educational mission integration, forming a partnership of excellence.

July 2011

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center partners with Lindner Center of HOPE on 16-bed adolescent unit and Partial Hospitalization Program.

August 2013

Construction begins on a building expansion project for an Adolescent Comprehensive Diagnostic Program.

October 2013

Lindner Center of HOPE earns “Top Performer on Key Quality Measures®” recognition from The Joint Commission.

May 2014

Newly constructed Sibcy House opens, as well as Williams House for adolescents.

March 2015

HOPE Center North opens and expands addiction services.

December 2016

Rapid Access Service becomes a new option for people in need of accessing care quickly.

December 2017

The Center receives an unprecedented $50 million pledge from Linda and Harry Fath, paired with a $25 million pledge from Frances and Craig Lindner.

July 2018

Rapid Access Service added for physicians in need of psychiatric evaluation and treatment.

2008

August

The 100,000 sq. ft. Lindner Center of HOPE opens to patients.

October

Lindner Center of HOPE designated as a National Center of Excellence by the National Network of Depression Centers.

2009

March

Craig and Frances Lindner receive the Innovator Award at the 2009 Health Care Heroes Awards Dinner hosted by the Business Courier.

Lindner Center of HOPE becomes a research partner with Mayo Clinic on the Bipolar Biobank.

July

Outpatient Service expands to accommodate children ages two and older.

November

The Farmer Family Neuromodulation Center opens. (ECT and TMS)

2011

May

Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health announce clinical, research and educational mission integration, forming a partnership of excellence.

July

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center partners with Lindner Center of HOPE on 16-bed adolescent unit and Partial Hospitalization Program.

2013

August

Construction begins on a building expansion project for an Adolescent Comprehensive Diagnostic Program.

October

Lindner Center of HOPE earns “Top Performer on Key Quality Measures®” recognition from The Joint Commission.

2014

May

Newly constructed Sibcy House opens, as well as Williams House for adolescents.

2015

March

HOPE Center North opens and expands addiction services.

2016

December

Rapid Access Service becomes a new option for people in need of accessing care quickly.

2017

December

The Center receives an unprecedented $50 million pledge from Linda and Harry Fath, paired with a $25 million pledge from Frances and Craig Lindner.

2018

July

Rapid Access Service added for physicians in need of psychiatric evaluation and treatment.

Where hope begins.

Mental health issues are never one-dimensional. That’s why at Lindner Center of HOPE, under the leadership of president and CEO Dr. Paul E. Keck, onsite multidisciplinary teams work collaboratively to tackle even the most challenging mental health conditions. This gives us the understanding to treat each patient with a highly individualized care plan best suited for their needs.

Renowned Leadership

Dr. Paul E. Keck President and CEO of Lindner Center of HOPE

As president and CEO of Lindner Center of HOPE, Dr. Paul E. Keck provides leadership and direction for the overall operation of the Center. A noted researcher in bipolar disorder and psychopharmacology, Dr. Keck has been the 7th-most cited scientist in the world in the fields of psychiatry and psychology for the past decade. He is also listed among “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” by Science Watch, a leading Web resource for science metrics and analysis.

Continuum of Care

Lindner Center of HOPE offers an exceptional continuum of care, addressing both common and more complex mental illnesses for patients, age 2 to senior-adult. Areas of excellence encompass anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and co-occurring disorders. The Center’s services include:

  • Psychiatric hospitalization for individuals age 12 and older
  • Outpatient services for all ages
  • Diagnostic and short-term residential services for adults and adolescents
  • Rapid Access Service for expedited outpatient assessments

Through programs at Sibcy House, Williams House, and HOPE Center North, we also offer inpatient and outpatient treatment and recovery support for opioid use disorders and other addictions.

We are addiction experts.

At the core of treatment and care at Lindner Center of HOPE is the understanding that addiction is a chemical, DNA-driven disease of the brain. We meet people where they are. We’ve assembled a strong team of addiction specialists who create individualized plans for each patient and surround them with compassion and an unwavering dedication to their recovery.

Mental illness is often an underlying cause of addiction. Lindner Center of HOPE is uniquely positioned to treat addiction and mental illness together.

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Our dream is to be able to make people healthy enough to follow theirs.

Doreen’s Story

In 2007, I was diagnosed with depression. I was stunned, afraid and helpless, and did not understand what this was, and why this was happening to me. I went to see a myriad of psychologists and psychiatrists who prescribed countless antidepressants, but I seemed to be slipping further and further away.

Then in 2009, desperate for relief, I saw Dr. Nelson Rodriguez at Lindner Center of HOPE. Dr. Rodriguez suggested I take a GeneSight test that was developed by Assurex Health in Mason, OH. As Dr. Rodriguez says, “it’s like a GPS for your brain.” The test results provided an understanding of the impact several medications would have on me, based on my genetic make-up.

With my test results, Dr. Rodriguez created a treatment plan for me. I was prescribed one medication and Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) treatments. The combination of medication and ECT brought me back to life again.

My dream is to publish two books: a cookbook to share my ancestral heritage and other recipes, and a second book to share my survival story of suffering from depression, heart disease, and past abusive relationships.

I want to shout from the rooftop to tell anyone suffering from mental illnesses that miracles can happen. Faith, hope, tenacity, and a positive outlook – combined with the most amazing team of doctors – are now available to help us conquer the stigma, helplessness and excruciating suffering from depression and other illnesses to make us whole again. I strive to make every day count and have the biggest smile of hope – raising awareness for this needed cause. Never give up. There is hope and we will survive.

Luke’s Story

Luke* epitomized the all-American teen. The 17-year-old’s grades were tops in the state of Connecticut. He was beloved by friends and family, and considered an all-around “good kid” by everyone who knew him.

In early spring of his junior year, however, Luke started experiencing concerning mood swings and paranoid behavior which led to violent incidents and calls for police help. Despite seeking help from his physicians, Luke’s symptoms continued.

Eventually, he was admitted to Williams House at the Lindner Center of HOPE.

Luke’s symptoms were diagnostically complex, but seemed to point to sudden onset, rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Four psychiatrists were consulted on the case, including Drs. Paul Keck and Susan McElroy, world renowned bipolar researchers. A physical therapist at UC was also engaged, as Luke expressed a need for a physical outlet. The Center’s collaborative nature and the unit’s adaptability allowed us to accommodate Luke’s complex needs.

Luke discharged from Williams House with a medication regimen and supports in place.

His grateful parents, Gretchen and Robert, understand what’s ahead. “This is a marathon. The staff worked with Luke to help him reframe how his senior year might look.”

“He came to understand that it’s okay to give himself time to heal. This is foundational as we move ahead. We feel it was a great blessing to start at Lindner.”

*Patient’s name changed for confidentiality.

“I want to shout from the rooftop to tell anyone suffering from mental illnesses that miracles can happen.”

Benjamin’s Story

Benjamin was 32 years old when he developed cancer. After the initial treatment, he was in remission for a year and a half before the cancer came back with a vengeance. The next time around, the fight was even more difficult and the pain unbearable. Fortunately, the cancer went into remission again, but in 2004, Benjamin suffered a work injury. His doctor prescribed painkillers, which he renewed frequently. After years of use, he knew he had a problem. “My husband knew it, too. He was going to leave me after 15 years together,” Benjamin said.

Benjamin had started buying pills off the street too, draining his savings. And he consistently used his entire paycheck to purchase the drugs.

“I became deceitful. I hated myself,” Benjamin stated. He went to rehab. Hated it, but knew he had to do it. After discharge, he came to Lindner Center of HOPE’s intensive outpatient program (IOP), participating in 12 weeks of programming. In addition, Benjamin receives Suboxone and has consistently seen Dr. Clifford Cabansag, Lindner Center of HOPE Addictions Medicine Physician, and Marie Doerger, Lindner Center of HOPE therapist, for the last three years.

“I can’t go back to where I was,” Benjamin said. “I cannot express enough how much the staff there helped me in my recovery.”

”I don’t think I would have come this far and stayed sober without the Lindner Center!”

For others struggling, Benjamin says, “They should imagine the darkest place they’ve been in their lives and acknowledge they don’t want to be there. You have to want help, and you got to start right now.”